White Chocolate Dreams

With the holidays quickly approaching, many often express frustration that they can’t enjoy some of their traditional “chocolate” treats. The main culprit is the caffeine found in milk and dark chocolates which has a neurostimulatory effect. That simple mug of hot milk chocolate could cause increased urinary frequency, urgency, migraine and rapid, irregular heartbeat. IBS patients may notice that it worsens constipation, nausea, gas and bowel spasms. GERD patients can experience worsening symptoms because chocolate acts to relax the sphincters at the top of the stomach. And if you’re facing surgery, experts suggest that you avoid chocolate at least two weeks prior to the surgery because cocoa can interfere with blood sugar control. White chocolate offers the richness and flavor without the bladder or gut distress!

White chocolate is made with the cocoa butter extracted from cocoa beans and contains only a trace amounts of the active stimulants found in cocoa solids. Yes, it has a very different taste but even diehard chocoholics enjoy the sweet, creamy flavor of good quality white choco- late.

Can you eat white chocolate if you’re allergic to dark or milk choco- late? Talk with an allergist and/or ask for sensitivity testing to determine what you can tolerate safely.

From enjoying a mug of hot chocolate on a cold winters day to savoring a white peppermint patty as an after dinner treat, it’s nice to have as an occasional treat! Emphasis on occasional because chocolate in all forms is still high in saturated fat andsugar. Here are some simple yet fabu- lous white hot chocolate recipes submitted to the IC Chef Cookbook for your dining pleasure! Enjoy!

White Chocolate Vanilla Bean “Cocoa” w/ Cinnamon Whipped Cream (n2indigoky)

3 cups whole milk
1 cup of good quality white chocolate, chopped
1 vanilla bean (I use a Madagascar vanilla bean)
sugar or honey to taste
1 cup whipping cream
dash cinnamon

Put milk in saucepan and split vanilla bean. Scrape out the middle and add the whole bean and scrap- ings to the milk (and/or brewed cof- fee) slowly bring to a boil, add white chocolate and then top with fresh whipped cream with a dash of cinna- mon. Enjoy! It’s my Sunday morning splurge!

You can also use no acid coffee to make this a latte, which is delicious! Add one cup of coffee in lieu of one of the cups of milk.

White Hot Chocolate (percy)

1 cup whole milk
1 cup half and half
1⁄4 lb. white chocolate (chopped or chips)
1⁄2 tsp. vanilla peppermint sticks

Heat milk and half and half on medium just below a simmer. Remove pot from heat and add the white chocolate. When the chocolate has melted, add the vanilla and stir. Reheat very gently. Serve with a pep- permint stick as a stirrer.

White Peppermint Patties

3/4 cup sweetened condensed milk
1 1/2 tsp. peppermint extract (if you can find peppermint oil use that, 1/4 tsp. It’s a nicer peppermint taste)
4 cups confectioner’s sugar
3 cups white chocolate chips
2 tsp. shortening

In a large mixing bowl, combine condensed milk and peppermint extract. Beat in enough confectioner’s sugar, a little at a time, to form a stiff dough that is no longer sticky. Form into 1 inch balls, then place on waxed paper and flatten with fingers to form patties. Let patties dry at room temperature two hours, turn- ing once.

In a medium saucepan over low heat, melt chocolate with shortening, stirring often. Remove from heat. Dip patties, one at a time, into chocolate by laying them on the tines of a fork and lowering the fork into the liquid. Let cool on waxed paper until set.

White Peppermint Snowballs

1/2 cups peanut butter
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, softened
1 (16-ounce) package confectioner’s sugar
2 cups white chocolate chips
1 Tbsp. vegetable shortening
1/2 cup shelled, unsalted peanuts

Line a large baking sheet with alu- minum foil and another with waxed paper; set both aside. Using an elec- tric mixer (or a wooden spoon), beat together the peanut butter and butter in a large bowl until blended and smooth. Add the sugar, 1/2 cup at a time; blend until smooth. Press the mixture into 1-inch balls. (The dough will be dry, so it may be easier

to form with damp hands.) Place the balls on the foil lined sheet. Let stand until firm, about 30 minutes.

Melt the white chocolate chips and shortening in a heatproof bowl set atop a pot of simmering water over medium-high heat. Stir continu- ously until smooth. Remove the pan from the heat. Using a toothpick for a handle, pierce each ball, then dip it into the melted chocolate. Spoon chocolate over the balls to coat them, if needed. Set them on the waxed- paper-lined sheet and top each with a peanut half. Refrigerate until set, about 30 minutes. Store in an air- tight container!

White Chocolate Pound Cake

1 cup evaporated milk
4 oz. white chocolate
1 cup butter (softened)
1 2⁄3 cups sugar
5 eggs
2 3⁄4 cups flour
1⁄2 tsp. baking soda 1⁄2 tsp. salt

Combine evaporated milk and white chocolate, stir over low heat until melted. Cool to room tempera- ture. Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs one at a time, beating well. Combine flour, soda and salt. Add to the creamed mixture alternately with the white chocolate mixture. Beat just until combined. Pour into a greased and floured 10” tube pan. Bake at 325F for 1 hour or until a toothpick comes out clean.

Icing

3 oz. white chocolate
1⁄4 cup butter (no substitutes)
2 cups confectioners sugar
1⁄2 tsp. vanilla
1 to 2 tbsp. milk

Melt white chocolate and butter over low heat until smooth, stirring often. Remove from heat and stir in confectioners sugar, vanilla and enough milk to reach desired consis- tency. Drizzle over cake.

White Chocolate Mousse

6 oz. chopped premium white chocolate
1 1⁄4 cups whipping cream
divided 2 egg whites
1⁄8 tsp. cream of tartar
2 tsp. granulated sugar
2 tsp. vanilla extract
Few drops mint extract

In a large bowl over (but not touching) simmering water, slowly melt your 6 oz. white chocolate with 1⁄4 cup cream, stirring occasionally. Set aside to cool to lukewarm for about 15 minutes. While it’s cooling, beat the remaining whipping cream with sugar, vanilla, and mint extract until peaks form. Set aside.

In another large bowl, with dry and clean beaters, whip the egg whites with cream of tartar until stiff peaks form but eggs are not dry. Gently fold the egg whites into the now-cooled chocolate mixture until just combined. Gently fold in the whipping cream until just combined. Caution: do not re-whip this or the texture will become granular. Dish the mousse.

By | 2017-01-18T12:01:05+00:00 December 12th, 2016|Diet & Food, IC Diet Project, Interstitial Cystitis Network Blog|Comments Off on White Chocolate Dreams

About the Author:

My Google Profile+ Jill Heidi Osborne is the president and founder of the Interstitial Cystitis Network, a health education company dedicated to interstitial cystitis, bladder pain syndrome and other pelvic pain disorders. As the editor and lead author of the ICN and the IC Optimist magazine, Jill is proud of the academic recognition that her website has achieved. The University of London rated the ICN as the top IC website for accuracy, credibility, readability and quality. (Int Urogynecol J - April 2013). Harvard Medical School rated both Medscape and the ICN as the top two websites dedicated to IC. (Urology - Sept 11). Jill currently serves on the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Panel (US Army) where she collaborates with researchers to evaluate new IC research studies for possible funding. Jill has conducted and/or collaborates on a variety of IC research studies on new therapeutics, pain care, sexuality, the use of medical marijuana, menopause and the cost of treatments, shining a light on issues that influence patient quality of life. An IC support group leader and national spokesperson for the past 20 years, she has represented the IC community on radio, TV shows, at medical conferences. She has written hundreds of articles on IC and its related conditions. With a Bachelors Degree in Pharmacology and a Masters in Psychology, Jill was named Presidential Management Intern (aka Fellowship) while in graduate school. (She was unable to earn her PhD due to the onset of her IC.) She spends the majority of her time providing WELLNESS COACHING for patients in need and developing new, internet based educational and support tools for IC patients, including the “Living with IC” video series currently on YouTube and the ICN Food List smartphone app! Jill was diagnosed with IC at the age of 32 but first showed symptoms at the age of 12.