Educating Loved Ones about Your Health During the Holidays -  Interstitial Cystitis Network 

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Educating Loved Ones about Your Health During the Holidays

Found a fabulous blog today with some lovely holiday coping articles. This one addresses the challenges that we often face in explaining our health limitations to family members. Check it out. Very sage advice here!

Published on December 13, 2012 by Toni Bernhard, J.D. in Turning Straw Into Gold

Chronic health problems pose a challenge to relationships any time of year. Most people don’t understand the debilitating effects, physical and mental, of unrelenting pain and illness—unless they experience it themselves or are the caregiver for someone who is experiencing it. During the rest of the year, many of us have learned to limit interactions with others in order to manage our symptoms.

But when the holidays arrive, if we’re not careful, we can find ourselves suddenly thrust into the middle of a lively and chaotic social scene where we’re expected to participate in a range of activities, often for days on end. As a result, this time of year can be a recipe for double disaster—the increase in activity exacerbates our physical symptoms, while coping with sadness, frustration, and maybe even guilt about our physical limitations gives rise to emotional pain.

No wonder many of us with health problems dread the holiday season.

We can do a lot to minimize the negative effects of the holidays on our health by being sure that loved ones know about our limitations. If you’re one of the many people with chronic health problems who don’t look sick, the burden is on you to make your condition “visible.” If you don’t take this pre-emptive action, people’s expectations of you may be way out of line with what you can handle.

Here are some suggestions for helping loved ones understand what your life is like so that all of you can better enjoy this time of year:

Read the suggestions and rest of the article here!

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/…g-the-holidays

By | 2017-01-18T12:08:29+00:00 December 19th, 2012|Interstitial Cystitis Network Blog|Comments Off on Educating Loved Ones about Your Health During the Holidays

About the Author:

My Google Profile+ Jill Heidi Osborne is the president and founder of the Interstitial Cystitis Network, a health education company dedicated to interstitial cystitis, bladder pain syndrome and other pelvic pain disorders.

As the editor and lead author of the ICN and the IC Optimist magazine, Jill is proud of the academic recognition that her website has achieved. The University of London rated the ICN as the top IC website for accuracy, credibility, readability and quality. (Int Urogynecol J – April 2013). Harvard Medical School rated both Medscape and the ICN as the top two websites dedicated to IC. (Urology – Sept 11). Jill currently serves on the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Panel (US Army) where she collaborates with researchers to evaluate new IC research studies for possible funding. Jill has conducted and/or collaborates on a variety of IC research studies on new therapeutics, pain care, sexuality, the use of medical marijuana, menopause and the cost of treatments, shining a light on issues that influence patient quality of life.

An IC support group leader and national spokesperson for the past 20 years, she has represented the IC community on radio, TV shows, at medical conferences. She has written hundreds of articles on IC and its related conditions.

With a Bachelors Degree in Pharmacology and a Masters in Psychology, Jill was named Presidential Management Intern (aka Fellowship) while in graduate school. (She was unable to earn her PhD due to the onset of her IC.) She spends the majority of her time providing WELLNESS COACHING for patients in need and developing new, internet based educational and support tools for IC patients, including the “Living with IC” video series currently on YouTube and the ICN Food List smartphone app! Jill was diagnosed with IC at the age of 32 but first showed symptoms at the age of 12.