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Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment Shows Great Promise For IC Treatment

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentrate of platelet-rich plasma protein derived from whole blood. It is extremely rich in growth factors and cytokines, which regulate tissue reconstruction. PRP has been used to encourage healing of various soft tissues in the human body as well as to assist in surgical wound healing.

Researchers in Taiwan conducted a novel study to determine if PRP could indeed help bladder healing in patients with IC. They enrolled 34 patients with IC/BPS in the study, to receive four monthly intravesical injections of 12 mL PRP extracted from 50 mL of the patient’s whole blood. The primary end-point is the symptoms assessed using the O’Leary-Sant symptom (OSS), the IC symptom index (ICSI), and IC problem index (ICPI) scores at 1 month after the 4th PRP injection. The pain score was reported by self- assessment using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) system. Daily fre- quency, nocturia, functional bladder capacity (FBC), cystometric bladder capacity (CBC), maximum flow rate, voided volume, post-void residual volume and global response assess- ment (GRA) were also recorded.

Of the 34 patients (31 women and 3 men), 21 of them (others ongoing) completed the four injections and the follow-up visits. Their mean age was 53.8±12.3 years. OSS, ICSI, ICPI and VAS significantly decreased and fre- quency and nocturia showed signifi- cant improvement. Other urody- namic parameters did not show sig- nificant change at one month follow- up.
The results show that repeated intravesical PRP injection is a possible effective treatment for medically refractory IC/BPS and provides sig- nificant symptom relief. PRP injec- tion is well tolerated and appears to be a safe and effective treatment to improve IC symptoms and urinary frequency.

Source: Shu-Yu W, et al. MP39-14 THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF PLATELET-RICH-PLASMA INTRAVES- ICAL REPEAT INJECTIONS FOR INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS/BLADDER PAIN SYNDROME REFRACTORY TO CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

By |2018-08-17T16:28:11+00:00August 17th, 2018|Interstitial Cystitis Network Blog, Research|Comments Off on Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment Shows Great Promise For IC Treatment

About the Author:

My Google Profile+ Jill Heidi Osborne is the president and founder of the Interstitial Cystitis Network, a health education company dedicated to interstitial cystitis, bladder pain syndrome and other pelvic pain disorders. As the editor and lead author of the ICN and the IC Optimist magazine, Jill is proud of the academic recognition that her website has achieved. The University of London rated the ICN as the top IC website for accuracy, credibility, readability and quality. (Int Urogynecol J - April 2013). Harvard Medical School rated both Medscape and the ICN as the top two websites dedicated to IC. (Urology - Sept 11). Jill currently serves on the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Panel (US Army) where she collaborates with researchers to evaluate new IC research studies for possible funding. Jill has conducted and/or collaborates on a variety of IC research studies on new therapeutics, pain care, sexuality, the use of medical marijuana, menopause and the cost of treatments, shining a light on issues that influence patient quality of life. An IC support group leader and national spokesperson for the past 20 years, she has represented the IC community on radio, TV shows, at medical conferences. She has written hundreds of articles on IC and its related conditions. With a Bachelors Degree in Pharmacology and a Masters in Psychology, Jill was named Presidential Management Intern (aka Fellowship) while in graduate school. (She was unable to earn her PhD due to the onset of her IC.) She spends the majority of her time providing WELLNESS COACHING for patients in need and developing new, internet based educational and support tools for IC patients, including the “Living with IC” video series currently on YouTube and the ICN Food List smartphone app! Jill was diagnosed with IC at the age of 32 but first showed symptoms at the age of 12.