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  1. #46
    ICN Member __KATIE__'s Avatar
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    Smile Article supporting antibacterial properties in blueberries

    I found an article supporting what has been discussed here about the antibacterial properties of blueberries and blueberry leaf tea:
    Getting to know blueberries

    The list of fruits that most ICers can easily tolerate (especially in any significant quantity) is very short. For some, this list literally consists only of pears, perhaps some melons, blackberries, dates, and/or blueberries. The blueberry, botanical name Vaccinium spp (there are many varieties of blueberries such as V. pallidum and V. corymbosum), is a unique and interesting fruit so it’s well worth learning about something you may form a tight, personal bond with!

    Blueberries are very closely related to the European bilberry, and, though popular, are not as common or well known as many other fruits. Though it is the berries that we commonly think of using (eating), the leaves are used medicinally as well. Blueberries were originally indigenous to the United States, but they are now cultivated in Canada and other parts of the world. Native peoples of North America have long been using the blueberry plant for both food and medicinal purposes.

    For years, blueberries have been making medical headlines, as they appear to have a bevy of disease-fighting properties. The compound pterostilbene, which is found in blueberries, has been linked to reductions in cholesterol levels. A study carried out by Agnes M. Rimando, a chemistry researcher for the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, compared pterostilbene and a cholesterol-lowering drug, Ciprofibrate, on rats and found that pterostilbene worked marginally better. This may be due to the fact that pterostilbene is an antioxidant, similar to the one found in grapes and red wine (resveratrol) that is also thought to aid in bad cholesterol reduction, such as the type that can lead to increased chances of stroke and cardiovascular disease.

    According to researchers at the USDA Human Nutrition Centre (HNRCA), out of 40 fresh fruits and vegetables that they studied, blueberries came out in the top spot when it comes to antioxidant activity! Antioxidants are necessary to the human body, they aid in neutralizing free radicals (negative or harmful by-products of metabolism) that can contribute to a wide range of health problems and illnesses. Researchers feel that it is Anthocyanin (a flavonoid), the pigment that is responsible for making blueberries blue, which is the most likely to be responsible for their health-helping properties. One of the benefits of antioxidants is that they appear to help the aging process. Blueberries (or compounds of the berries) appear promising as a possible treatment for such age related conditions as Alzheimer’s.


    Did you know?

    Every 100g of fresh blueberries contain 13mg of vitamin C,

    1 mg of vitamin E, 0.04 mg of beta-carotene, 6ug (a measure of
    folic acid) of folic acid,

    and 10 retinol Equivalents (a measure of vitamin A) of vitamin
    A



    Studies from Europe and Japan have also noted that blueberries may improve eyesight and eye fatigue (a symptom which affects many of us with multiple medical conditions). Again, scientists think it is the anthocyanin that is primarily responsible for these effects.

    Another potentially helpful substance that is found in blueberries is called Ellagic acid (or ellagitannin). Blueberries also contain folic acid, and though it is not totally understood why, both of these acids may inhibit cancer growth such as cervical cancer. Folic acid is also thought to benefit the fetus during pregnancy.

    Blueberries contain a decent about of fibre, which may be why one 1976 study from Sweden found them to be beneficial in the treatment of childhood diarrhea. Every 100 grams of blueberries contains 2.7g of fibre (the daily recommended dose is 25g). But it is perhaps blueberries’ valuable help in preventing urinary tract infections (UTI’s) that makes them most appealing to ICers.

    For reasons that scientists cannot yet fully explain, ICers seem to have a substantial history with UTIs. Though not every ICer has trouble with frequent (or reoccurring and often persistent) UTI’s, many do. A “cruel” truth is that many with IC are also misdiagnosed as simply having UTIs. In a more just world IC would make your bladder immune to other ailments, in the real world this is not the case (sadly). Many with IC continue to develop UTIs even after they begin IC treatment. Part of the reason for this occurrence may be that IC bladders are already in a damaged/weakened state and are less able to fend off bacteria and other harmful substances which may cause UTIs.

    Traditionally people with UTIs are advised to drink cranberry juice as it has been shown to prevent the spread of E. coli bacteria, a bacterium commonly responsible for UTI’s. Cranberries (and their juices) help to stop bacteria from sticking to the inner walls of the bladder. The downside to cranberries is that they are highly acidic, so much so that the vast majority of IC patients simply cannot consume them without increasing their symptoms and going into a flare. Enter the humble, yet powerful blueberry.

    Though fewer studies have thus far been carried out with blueberries for the prevention and treatment of UTI’s, scientists at Rutgers University in New Jersey have found and identified a blueberry compound which helps to reduce the chances of infection and promote urinary tract well-being. As most of us with IC are able to tolerate eating blueberries it might be an idea to make them your new cranberries. (Note, neither blueberries nor cranberries are intended to replace antibiotics or other medications used to formally treat UTIs. It is recommended that you talk to your health care provider about using them in this manner).

    Additionally, herbal textbooks of yore and traditional folk remedies have long employed the use of blueberry plant leaves. Traditionally, as noted in Edible and Medicinal Plants of the West by G.L. Tilford (1997), the leaves were brewed as a tea to help with poor appetite, diabetes, and UTIs. A tea is steeped by combining 250ml (1 cup) of boiling water and 10 grams of dried leaves, then allowing the mixture to sit for 15 minutes. I have not come across any medical references that indicate any part of the blueberry plant can interfere with drugs or medications.

    Blueberries have been dubbed “nutraceutical”, a word that is being used more and more often to describe a food substance that provides health benefits, such as the treatment or prevention of disease. This is a broad term, though, spanning everything from specific nutrients to genetically altered or modified foods. The word nutraceutical was first introduced in 1989 by The Foundation for Innovation in Medicine to describe this branch (area of focus) of biomedical research. Nutraceutical has now become common lingo in both the medical and scientific worlds of food and drug study.

    The health food supplement market has caught wind of the “power” of blueberries, as numerous brands now sell concentrated blueberry juices and capsules. I have not yet tried these myself, so I can’t personally say whether or not they are effective or how they interact with an IC bladder. Before trying blueberry capsules you may want to speak to a doctor or pharmacist who is well informed about health food supplements and treatments. If you would like to read more about some of the brands on the market, a better-known brand is Flavonoid Sciences: Caps
    and concentrated juice.

    You don’t have to rush out and buy flats of blueberries (unless they’re on sale for a killer deal and you have a large freezer). Like most healthy foods the key to blueberry use is to incorporate them into your every day IC friendly diet. And despite what happens to the character “Violet” in the children’s book Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, you won’t turn blue from eating blueberries.

    Blueberries are well known as muffin, pie, and pancake ingredients, but they are such a versatile fruit that they can be incorporated into tons of recipes. I have added blueberries to scones, cakes, pilaffs, meat dishes, drinks, ice cream and even as a cold soup. The recipe section of ICadvice contains yummy blueberry recipes and more will certainly be added over time.

    Blueberries can be a bit pricey, and like with most foods, especially produce, it is best to try and find organic varieties. But if you can get hold of some whenever possible, they make a lovely and tasty addition to your artillery of IC friendly foods.
    By Jessica at Oct 8 2006 - 7:47am | Diet and nutrition


    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by __KATIE__; 03-26-2007 at 03:29 AM. Reason: to show article
    God Bless You!
    Katie

    Dx:
    Moderate IC since 1999, pelvic floor dysfunction and myofascial pain, IBS, Vestibulitis, Sinusitis, Asthma, moderate-severe GERD since1998, Allergies -environmental, medication, food & chemical since 1996, gluten free and improving since 9/2007, Tendinitis, FMS Dx 4/2007 but have had symptoms since 2001, Reynaud's Syndrome.
    Current Rx & Tx:Neurontin, Prilosec 40mg, Reglan, Albuterol, Pulmicort, Flonase, Detrol LA 4mg, Urelle, Align, Jarro-dophilus EPS, D-Mannose, marshmallow root tincture. Pelvic floor release- internal and external since 12/06. Bladder instills:sodium bicarb/elmiron/lidocaine.
    Previous Rx:
    Lyrica 75mg, Nortriptyline, & amitriptyline -too many side effects. Elmiron 100mg: - stomach upset/ too strong, but effective. Vesicare -hurt bladder, burned. Apri- made flares worse. Zovia: -hair fell out, severe gastritis, made IC worse. Pyridium: makes me sick.

    Procedures:
    Urodynamics: 8/2001 Radiogragh w/ contrast-distension: 5/1999 Tonsil/adenoidectomy: 12/1997 Cholecystectomy: 2/2006, cystoscopy 1/2008- trabeculations esp. on Rt. side of bladder wall (apparently ruffles aren't the only things with ridges).

  2. #47
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    what type of blueberry tea are you using for bladder and prostate prob?

    Could you let me know what type of tea you are using and where to get it. I have been using some I got from the Natural Food store here and I think it does help. I just thought if there was an organic kind or a specific kind that you have found to be helpful. My husband has also had an enlarge prostate and is on Flomax-just wondered if we could get him something too or if the same tea could help both that would be great. Thanks so much,
    Susan

  3. #48
    ICN Member __KATIE__'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLP53ICIB View Post
    Could you let me know what type of tea you are using and where to get it. I have been using some I got from the Natural Food store here and I think it does help. I just thought if there was an organic kind or a specific kind that you have found to be helpful. My husband has also had an enlarge prostate and is on Flomax-just wondered if we could get him something too or if the same tea could help both that would be great. Thanks so much,
    Susan
    Hi Susan,
    I get the blueberry leaf tea from a whole foods store as well under the manufacturer alvita which you can also buy online. I've read only medical claims about its benefits for IC sufferers, but haven't researched anything on prostate health. Sorry I couldn't be more of a help. Marshmallow root tea is supposedly soothing to the bladder and is also made into tinctures for such purposes which I've experimented with. I'm going to do another trial under different circumstances other than when I had a bacterial infection to get a better base line. Trial and error is an essential part of life, what may work for one person may not work for another so in conclusion I encourage you to try for yourself to see and let me know.
    Take care,
    Katie
    God Bless You!
    Katie

    Dx:
    Moderate IC since 1999, pelvic floor dysfunction and myofascial pain, IBS, Vestibulitis, Sinusitis, Asthma, moderate-severe GERD since1998, Allergies -environmental, medication, food & chemical since 1996, gluten free and improving since 9/2007, Tendinitis, FMS Dx 4/2007 but have had symptoms since 2001, Reynaud's Syndrome.
    Current Rx & Tx:Neurontin, Prilosec 40mg, Reglan, Albuterol, Pulmicort, Flonase, Detrol LA 4mg, Urelle, Align, Jarro-dophilus EPS, D-Mannose, marshmallow root tincture. Pelvic floor release- internal and external since 12/06. Bladder instills:sodium bicarb/elmiron/lidocaine.
    Previous Rx:
    Lyrica 75mg, Nortriptyline, & amitriptyline -too many side effects. Elmiron 100mg: - stomach upset/ too strong, but effective. Vesicare -hurt bladder, burned. Apri- made flares worse. Zovia: -hair fell out, severe gastritis, made IC worse. Pyridium: makes me sick.

    Procedures:
    Urodynamics: 8/2001 Radiogragh w/ contrast-distension: 5/1999 Tonsil/adenoidectomy: 12/1997 Cholecystectomy: 2/2006, cystoscopy 1/2008- trabeculations esp. on Rt. side of bladder wall (apparently ruffles aren't the only things with ridges).

  4. #49
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    Thank you for mentioning about Rosehips, I was wondering, what the hell it is and why it's in buffered C supplement, never got around to checking it out. It explains why I feel really bad after taking Vitamin C. There is 250mg of Rosehips.

    Along with other ingredients like: Hesperidin, Rutin and Bioflavornoids. I see some Buffered Vitamin C, that states "citrus bioflavornoids", is that okay?

    The person who mentioned the blueberry tea, did mention, orange peel, does that bother the bladder?

    Blueberry tea leaf, I'm intrigued. But the direutic effect, scares me, I guess why some people say, Marshmallow Root caused them to flare up, but because it's a duretic, it works that way.

  5. #50
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    Can someone send me the web site where I can purchase this tea to try.
    [SIZE="1"][SIZE="2"]Please send all private messages to 5star@mchsi.com. I do not check my ICN mailbox much.
    Symptoms:
    24/7 Bladder Pain, Mild Urgency and Frequency. Always tired and fatigued. Trouble sleeping due to bladder pain and trips to bathroom.
    Allergies/Sensitivities:
    Alcohol(big time!), Soft drinks. Foods dont bother me.
    Current Supplements: None presently
    Conventional medications!!!!!: Nuerontin, Hydroxyzine, Elmiron, Tramadol
    Tried many other medications... will list later

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean76 View Post
    Can someone send me the web site where I can purchase this tea to try.
    ME TOO!! I can't figure out where to get this stuff!!

    -Jenny

  7. #52
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    You could usually find the blueberry leaf tea at a health food store. It does not taste like blueberries, as it is made from the leaf. I believe the brand that makes it is Altiva, or celebration, not sure, but it is one of those.
    Jen

  8. #53
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    Key in text "Alvita bluberry leaf tea" on Yahoo search, it'll come up with online stores selling them, the first result will give you an idea of the product. "Alvita blueberry leaf tea in 30 bags". Evitamins has it.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean76 View Post
    This is ridiculuos! Where are the URL's for the blueberry tea? Has some moderator deleted them?
    Can someone send the blueberry site to me via e-mail. I would like to try the tea.
    Kind of makes me wish there was an IC Network underground movement to provide the options that aren't sponsored by the "institution".
    Hi, I'm Kev - husband of IC sufferer.

    symptoms - an owee wife

  10. #55
    ICN Member SandyRN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qooty View Post
    Kind of makes me wish there was an IC Network underground movement to provide the options that aren't sponsored by the "institution".

    I'm pretty sure you're capable of reading the rules....if you've done so then you already know that there is no advertising of any kind on the site. That said, I'm quite certain you are capable of googling blueberry tea. There is plenty of information left on this thread to figure it out. I was able to find it, surely you should be able to.
    *IC-- Summer 2004; PFD--October 2005
    *Fibro--Fall 2000; CFS-- Fall 2000
    *MPS--Fall 2000; Crohn's disease-- 1997*IBS,GERD, *Migraines, hypothyroidism, GYN problems *Degenerative Disc Disease/scoliosis

    Total Abdominal Hysterectomy--adenomyosis--9\08

    04/17/09 Crohn's disease almost killed me with a combo of extreme constipation from pain medications. My bowel ruptured, I almost died from peritonitis and spent several days in the ICU then more in a private room on the floor. If you have any questions about severe constipation from pain meds please don't hesitate to send me a message.

  11. #56
    Forum Manager ICNDonna's Avatar
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    There's a reason we don't allow advertising. We get at least ten registrations per day from people who just want to advertise everything from porn sites to automobile supplies. If we were to open the forums to all advertising, we would be an ad site, not a support site.

    There are some sites where IC is discussed and you can advertise at will. You might want to check some of those.

    Donna
    Have you checked the ICN Shop?
    http://www.icnsales.com for US & Canada
    http://www.icnshop.com for all others

    Patient Help: http://www.ic-network.com/patientlinks.html

    Diet list: https://www.ic-network.com/patient-r...on/#icfoodlist

    You'll find my story at: http://www.ic-network.com/conditions...tories/page/6/

    I am not a medical authority nor do I offer medical advice. In all cases, I strongly encourage you to discuss your medical treatment with your personal medical care provider. Only they can, and should, give medical recommendations to you.

    Anyone who says something is foolproof hasn't met a determined fool
    .....My Meggie.....

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